Fatburger Singapore introduces the latest Impossible Burger

American burger-chain Fatburger has launched its new customisable Impossible Burger at its halal-certified restaurants in Singapore, and it’s priced at only S$10.90 – the cheapest in the market right now.

Having taken the world by storm since its debut at New York’s lauded Momofuku Nishi in 2016, the Impossible Burger made its foray into Asia just last year in Hong Kong. Fatburger opened its first shop in Singapore in March 2019.

The Impossible Burger uses plant-based meat that is made to fry, taste, and smell just like meat, leaving diners, especially meat-lovers, wondering the possibility of such a taste. Adding to that, the patties also contains no gluten, no animal hormones and no antibiotics, plus it’s halal-certified and kosher. This means that everyone can sink their teeth into the juicy burger with no guilty feeling.

For anyone who wish to get hold of the burger, they can opt to load it up with their own choices of fresh ingredients like crunchy pickles, tomatoes, lettuce, onion, relish and mayo sandwiched between squishy toasted brioche buns.

Those who wish to try out the Impossible Burgers at Fatburger, they can make their way to the chain’s two outlets in KINEX Mall and Velocity @ Novena Square.

Founded by Lovie Yancey in 1952, Fatburger is known around the world for its thick and juicy hamburgers. Available in over 200 locations across 25 countries, these massive offerings have earned a cult following that includes many Hollywood celebrities.

Apart from Fatburger, there are many other burger-joints that embarked on meatless patties. Since 1 April, Burger King introduced a new Whopper that is identical in taste to the original, except that the beef patty is substituted with one that is made of heme. White Castle is also offering a slider version of heme patties produced by Impossible Foods while Carl’s Jr.’s veggie burger is from a partnership with another plant-based meat company, Beyond Meat.

In fact, even Senior Minister and Coordinating Minister for Social Policies Tharman Shanmugaratham recently endorsed the meatless burger by Burger King after trying it himself. He shared a Vox article of the burger on his Facebook page, affirming the Whopper’s delectability and its environmental initiative.

“This is a huge deal for those who want to see meat alternatives replace actual meat because of concerns over animal cruelty or climate change. If this scales up, it could help save hundreds of thousands of animals from suffering on factory farms, and it could fight global warming by reducing the number of methane-producing cattle. It could also combat other problems like antibiotic resistance,” he wrote.