Certis APO kicking PMD rider; LTA says that it does not condone any behaviour that deviates from the established rules of engagement

Footage showing officer kicking the PMD which resulted in the rider falling down

Commenting on the incident where a Certis Cisco Auxillary Police Officer kicked a PMD rider off the road, the Land Transport Authority said in a Facebook post that it does not condone any behaviour that deviates from the established rules of engagement.

According to LTA, a team of LTA Active Mobility Enforcement Officers (AMEOs) and APOs was conducting enforcement duties along Bedok Reservoir Road at about 6.40pm on Tuesday.

When signalled by the APOs to stop, a PMD rider took evasive action. He was subsequently stopped by another APO stationed at the next junction.

As shown in the shocking footage was shared by community-run traffic website, ROADS.sg. on Tuesday (10 Dec), the video captured by a vehicle’s dashcam showed an enforcement officer kicking the rider off his device along Bedok Reservoir Road. Due to the impact of the kick, the rider was seen flying onto the asphalt road.

LTA, SPF and Certis are said to be looking into the incident.

LTA noted that it had contracted Certis Cisco to carry out enforcement and it does not condone any behaviour that deviates from the established rules of engagement.

LTA is also investigating offences committed by the PMD rider, which include riding an unregistered and non-compliant (30.54kg) PMD on public roads, and failing to stop his device when required by an officer. The PMD involved has been impounded.

Based on an update on ROADS.sg’s Facebook page, the man was hurt and was sent by the police to the hospital.

Since 5 November this year, e-scooters were banned on footpaths in Singapore, after Senior Minister of State for Transport Lam Pin Min announced it a day earlier in Parliament.

Although e-scooters are banned from being used on roads and footpaths in the Republic, but it will still be allowed on cycling paths and Park Connector Networks (PCNs).

Those found guilty of the crime can be fined up to S$2,000 and jail time of up to three months once the ban is strictly enforced from 2020.

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