5,000 people filed application for Private Hire Car Driver’s Vocational Licence in three days

A man hand holding screen shot of Grab Taxi app showing on iPhone 6 in the car from Shutterstock.com

Land Transport Authority (LTA) has announced on Wednesday (15 March) that 5,000 people have filed their applications for the Private Hire Car Driver's Vocational Licence (PDVL) since the registration opened on Monday (13 March).

Last week, LTA announced that drivers who wish to provide private hire car services may download the application form from the LTA and should return the completed form by 30 June 2017.

LTA noted that applicants must hold a Class 3/3A driving licence which has been valid for a continuous period of at least two years at the point of applying for the PDVL.

It said that all applicants will be required to undergo a medical examination and will be subject to background checks, adding that all applicants need to pay a non-refundable $40 application fee.

However, LTA said that applicants who are not Singapore citizens, such as Singapore Permanent Residents and Foreign Work Pass holders, must be employees of a company providing chauffeured services in order to be eligible for the PDVL.

As for Singapore citizens, the current policy is that if they are not driving as employees, they need to be registered owners of a chauffeured services business will no longer be required.

"Singapore Citizens can apply for a PDVL as a self-employed driver," it said.

Applicants will need to register for the 10-hour PDVL course with the Singapore Taxi Academy after LTA has received and processed their application.

LTA noted that private hire car drivers whose applications reach LTA by 30 June 2017 will have up to one year to attend and pass the PDVL course.

Uber Singapore General Manager, Warren Tseng, stated in an update on Wednesday that 50 percent of their drivers has registered for the programme over the weekend.

Ms Tseng said that drivers have passed on feedback on the impact of the PDVL.

He said that the drivers have delivered their concerns over the impact of the licensing requirements on groups such as the hearing impaired and single mothers, as well as those who drive for a few hours a week or were in-between jobs.

The General Manager said, "Given these valid concerns, Uber will continue to work closely with the LTA to ensure that (the new requirements) reflect technological advancements such as online training, and don’t unnecessarily inhibit people from accessing the technology they need for independent work."

As for Grab, it has stated last week that it is going to invest S$10 million into its GrabCar service, saying that fund will be allocated to pay the bill for related costs, such as for medical check-ups, training, tests, and the application fee.

It also said that the platform will set up an online portal to facilitate applications from drivers, including preparing their records in advance and issuing reminders.

This entry was posted in Current Affairs, Transport.