Photo of a Cabinet meeting on 24 Apr shared by PM Lee before changes for a Cabinet reshuffle take place on May 1. (Photo: MCI)

Simon Lim: Call for more people to help the needy sounded so empty and hollow when ministers pay themselves with high salaries and bonuses

by Simon Lim

On page B3 of Thursday’s Straits Times, Minister for Trade and Industry, Chan Chun Sing was quoted as saying that Singapore needs more people who will help the needy. I agree with him.

Our absolute poverty families in Singapore under this pap government is staggering. There are also many broken families with a family member/s in prison. I also understand that the application for rental flats is long too. All that and more is bad news.

To help the needy, we basically need two things, money and time. The People’s Action Party government is rich and so, money isn’t a big issue but time?

Many Singaporeans generally work one of the longest hours among the developed countries in the world. Many working-class Singaporeans hardly have enough time for their own family bondings and even more, try to catch up on their sleep deficiency over the week-ends.

I would like to ask Chan CS what are those Resident Councils (RCs), Citizens’ Consultative Committees (CCCs) and People’s Association etc doing with regards to helping our needy in real and meaningful ways? I understand that many such committee members enjoy privileges and perks such as free parking and priority school registrations for their children etc but how much really are they doing in helping our needy citizens?

I know also that there are some voluntary organisations, religious groups and students who sometimes visit needy families and give them groceries but many are ad hoc in nature and few in between.

Personally, I feel that when Singapore ministers know how to pay themselves such high political salaries and bonuses that too many of our citizens can only admire, dream, talk about, salivate and feel jealous of, calls like what Chan CS made for more people to help the needy sounded so empty and hollow. Seriously, it sounded so empty and hollow. Think.

This was first published on Simon Lim’s Facebook page and reproduced with permission.