The Online Citizen

Silence of the dissenters: How south-east Asia keeps web users in line

Silence of the dissenters: How south-east Asia keeps web users in line
October 22
09:10 2010

From The Guardian:

Governments across south-east Asia are following China‘s authoritarian censorship of the digital world to keep political dissent in check, the Guardian can reveal.

VietnamBurmaThailandCambodia and the Philippines have all moved or are moving towards monitoring internet use, blocking international sites regarded as critical and ruthlessly silencing web dissidents.

• In Vietnam, the Communist party wants to be your “friend” on the state-run version of Facebook, provided you are willing to share all personal details.

• In Burma, political unrest can be silenced by cutting off the country from the internet.

• In Thailand, website moderators can face decades in jail for a posted comment they did not even write, if the government deems it injurious tothe monarchy.

While much is made of China’s authoritarian attitudetowards internet access, a majority of south-east Asian governments have similar controls and , rather than relaxing restrictions on internet use, many are moving towards tighter regulation.

Read the full article on The Guardian.

  • authoritarian gov

    DO NOT THINK THAT SG ARE ANY BETTER. IN THIS PART OF THE WORLD AUTHORITARIAN GOV ARE EVERYWHERE. EVEN A COUNTRY LIKE BURMA WITH SO BAD Humanitarium RECORDS OUR GOV ALSO SUPPORT THEM AND THEY ARE A PART OF ASEAN. HAHAHA

  • ihavnoOPENNET

    In Thailand, website moderators can face decades in jail for a posted comment they did not even write, if the government deems it injurious tothe monarchy.
    …………
    in thailand even if you shout or insult the monarchy in patpong mart…
    you still faced a severe sentence…
    which brought the downfall of thaksin..
    he didnt shout @ the monarchy..
    he just don’t give FACE to the monarchy nia…
    in north korea..even better
    no internet @ all…
    so dont bothered to brin your mini netbook over there or your ipad/iphone4

  • mackinder

    Taken into the SEA context, we’re pretty liberal, tbh.

  • liberal@bothered.com

    “Humanitarian” lah not “Humanitarium”

  • popcorn

    South East Asian countries are increasingly tuned to an authoritarian type of Govt, recently former PM of Malaysia, Dr
    Mahathir, said democracy is unsuitable for many countries, it could lead to hung Parliament like in UK and Australia.
    So many countries are looking towards China, and perhaps Singapore, to govern their people, and yet have economic growth and stability.
    Slowly they copy countries with one-party system of Govt, although they could not dare admit it in public.
    So the first step is to monitor and block websites that are deemed anti-Govt. In Singapore the socio-political website, Temasek Review, made famous by our Sovereign Fund, Temasek Holdings,
    has been known to have its website blocked by our Govt periodically up to two days when certain articles are deemed over the limit, perhaps as a form of punishment.
    Thus we could say SEA is politically regressing, as far as democracy is concerned, with everybody looking up to China as a leader in authoritarian governership.

  • preston loon

    Let ‘s face it,every country has its own censorship,including even Singapore.I am surprised that Singapore is not on its list.Hmmm!,something is amiss.

  • Ken

    So long as China leads the way, authoritarian governments will follow in its footsteps and in its shadow.

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